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Western Governors' Wildlife Council - Pilot Projects

Alaska is working with local and federal governments, NGOs, industry and university partners to prepare and consolidate spatial data for respective aquatic/resident fish, arctic migratory caribou herds. Through this effort they will demonstrate capabilities to define crucial habitats and corridors using common definitions outlined in a Western Governors' Wildlife Council white paper. Alaska

 

Arizona, California, Nevada and Utah are identifying areas of wildlife conservation potential at a landscape scale. Their goal is to develop a useful and consistent source of mapped biological information across the Southwestern states. At the end of this two year pilot project, each state will be positioned for designing, building and implementing a publically available mapping tool that can be used to encourage energy development that minimizes impact to wildlife. Southwest

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Colorado and New Mexico are working to implement an MOU signed by Governors Ritter and Richardson last December. Their joint pilot will identify and prioritize crucial habitat and important wildlife corridors in the region, and will evaluate potential threats to those corridors from future development. The creation of publically available wildlife mapping tools will guide the development of strategies to aid the management of crucial wildlife habitat and important migration corridors shared by these two states. Colorado, New Mexico

 

Idaho and Montana are partnering in the coordination of a transboundary wildlife mapping tool for fish, wildlife and habitats along the Idaho-Montana Divide. The pilot will focus on shrub-steppe, high desert and coniferous forest ecosystems and associated fish, wildlife and plant species in the Bailey's Ecoregional Sections of the Beaverhead Mountains, Idaho Batholith, Bitterroot Mountains, and Flathead Valley. The joint development of this mapping tool will make it easier for developers and state agencies to identify areas where development can occur with minimal impacts to wildlife. Idaho, Montana

Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota are jointly identifying important habitat for priority wildlife species affected by energy and transmission development. Habitat mapping will be combined with energy site planning to allow for improved risk assessment and planning of future energy and transmission sites.  Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota

Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas are identifying crucial Lesser Prairie Chicken habitat across the five LPC states, which include Colorado, New Mexico and Texas. Once crucial habitat for the species is identified across the five-state region, the states will work together to assess risk of habitat loss in relation to various threats, such as wind energy development and agriculture. Ultimately the states will be developing a range-wide mapping tool that could be used to identify areas important for LPC conservation, as well as connecting corridors for population maintenance. Kansas, Oklahoma

Idaho, Oregon and Washington are partnering in the conceptualization and coordination of a transboundary wildlife mapping tool for fish, wildlife and habitats that occur along the Columbia Plateau Ecoregion in those three states. The pilot will focus on the Arid Lands shrub-steppe, high desert, and associated fish, wildlife, and plant species in those states. The joint development of this mapping tool will make it easier for developers and the states to identify areas where development can occur with minimal impacts to wildlife. Idaho, Oregon, Washington

Wyoming is building a wildlife mapping tool that will function seamlessly across all political jurisdictions within the state. They will develop a centralized database for housing important wildlife information and will make that information publically available to help identify areas where development, particularly energy development, can occur with minimal impacts to wildlife. Wyoming