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First work session of Species Conservation and ESA Initiative delivers recommendations to incentivize voluntary conservation

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Denver Gov Mead Making Point with MediaWyoming Gov. Matt MeadIn 2015 Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead, as Chairman of the Western Governors’ Association, launched the Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative.

Workshops, webinars and questionnaires during the Initiative's first year enabled thousands of stakeholders representing diverse interests to explore options for improving species conservation efforts and the efficacy of the Endangered Species Act (ESA). That regional dialogue was captured in the Year One Report and Appendix in six over-arching themes that included, among others, Incentivizing Voluntary Conservation, Investing in Science and Measurable Outcomes, and Law and Policy Recommendations.

WGA now is conducting a series of targeted work sessions to elicit more detailed input about those key themes and develop an understanding of challenges that may impede implementation of bipartisan policy recommendations.  In Denver on Nov. 16, 2016, WGA hosted the first work session on the theme of "Incentivizing Voluntary Conservation."

One outcome of the work session was a series of recommendations. Although the recommendations don't necessarily reflect consensus agreement from participants, all were informed by a robust bipartisan dialogue. They included:

  • Increase the number of conservation programs that come with regulatory assurances;
  • Find a way to provide assurances on public land so that Candidate Conservation Agreements more closely resemble Candidate Conservation Agreements with Assurances;
  • Collaboration by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service with states to provide models and templates to incentivize proactive voluntary conservation.

Read, download report, including all 12 recommendations

For more information on the Initiative work session series, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Get the latest news about the West and its governors by following the Western Governors' Association on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

Species Spotlight: Protecting the gopher tortoise and its ecosystem

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gophertortThe gopher tortoise is an upland tortoise species native to Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and Florida. Gopher tortoise habitat consists of extensive burrows dug by the tortoise, primarily in longleaf pine forests, pastures and coastal dunes. Gopher tortoise burrows provide habitat for more than 350 other species, making the tortoise a keystone species for the ecosystems where they live.

In 1987, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) listed the gopher tortoise as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in Louisiana, Mississippi and the western portion of Alabama. In 2011, the Service determined that the gopher tortoise was a candidate for listing in the remainder of its range.

This installment of Species Spotlight examines the ongoing voluntary conservation efforts by state, federal and private partners to recover the species where it is currently listed as threatened and preclude the need to list more of its range.

CONSERVATION ACTIONS

The primary threats to the gopher tortoise include habitat loss and habitat alteration from land development. Additionally, certain forestry practices in longleaf pine forests can be harmful to gopher tortoises. Overly crowded forests and fire suppression can limit habitat and forage availability for tortoises, while site preparation for silviculture operations can destroy tortoise burrows and nests. Efforts to relocate tortoises to protected or undeveloped sites can also lead to road mortality, as gopher tortoises frequently migrate from areas where they have been relocated.

More than 80% of gopher tortoise habitat is located on private lands, making voluntary practices pivotal to the success of any conservation strategy. Numerous collaborative conservation programs encompassing federal, state, local and private parties have emerged to meet the challenge of recovering the threatened western portion of tortoise, while preventing the need to list the eastern population of the species.

In 2008, the Service entered a Candidate Conservation Agreement (CCA) for the eastern population of gopher tortoise. The signatories of the CCA include the Service, the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Forest Service, the fish and wildlife agencies of Alabama, Florida, Georgia and South Carolina, and numerous non-governmental organizations (NGOs).

The 2008 CCA established a cooperative, range-wide approach to tortoise conservation and management in the eastern portion of the tortoise’s range. The CCA is flexible and voluntary, allowing individualized conservation and management actions to be adopted at varying levels by individual partners. This CCA created the foundation of the first-ever collaboratively developed range-wide conservation strategy for the gopher tortoise.

The Service also established several voluntary Safe Harbor Agreements for listed western gopher tortoises and Candidate Conservation Agreements with Assurances in the candidate eastern range. Further, the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) added the gopher tortoise as a target species of the Working Lands for Wildlife (WLFW) partnership. NRCS offers technical and financial assistance to help producers on private land voluntarily conserve gopher tortoise habitat. Technical assistance is free to producers, and financial assistance allows producers to plan and implement a variety of conservation activities in gopher tortoise habitat such as prescribed fire, prescribed grazing, longleaf pine establishment and vegetation management.

RESULTS

Since 2012, the WLFW program has enabled producers to conserve or create more than 278,000 acres of longleaf pine forests. NRCS and state, federal and NGO partners continue to work to establish and manage longleaf pine stands, increase documentation and monitoring of gopher tortoise populations, and strategically implement landscape-scale habitat improvements for the tortoise.

The NRCS is also working with conservation partners to develop priority areas for conservation (PACs) to increase effectiveness of on-the-ground habitat conservation efforts. Through targeted conservation efforts in PACs, the Service, state wildlife agencies and NRCS are aiming to protect an additional 205,000 acres of gopher tortoise habitat by the end of fiscal year 2018.

Additional research on gopher tortoise population trends and habitat needs is necessary. It is likely that the gopher tortoise may always require some form of active habitat management to maintain a healthy population. Because of the tortoise’s status as a keystone species, work to restore gopher tortoise habitat will benefit a wide array of other species. In total, 28 additional threatened and endangered species are dependent on longleaf pine forests and will benefit from gopher tortoise conservation efforts.

Species Spotlight, a case study series examining the challenges and opportunities in species conservation, is part of the Western Governors' Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative, the past Chairman's Initiative of Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead.

More in the Species Spotlight series: 

Get the latest news about the West and its governors by following the Western Governors' Association on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

 

Western Governors request 'substantive' consultation on ESA compensatory mitigation

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2000px US FishAndWildlifeService Logo.svgWestern Governors have requested that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) engage in "substantive and ongoing consultation" with Governors and state regulators in regard to the draft Endangered Species Act Compensatory Mitigation Policy.

The comments delivered on Oct. 17, 2016, to FWS Director Dan Ashe specifically seek clarity around landscape-scale compensatory mitigation in the West and the definition of “net conservation gain.”

The Governors remind that they have management responsibility for all fish and wildlife within their states’ borders and that "moreover, because of their close working relationships with local governments and landowners, they are in a unique position to assist the Service in implementing the ESA."

Read, download the comments. 

Get the latest news about the West and its governors by following the Western Governors' Association on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

Work continues in year two of Western Governors' Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative

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Gov Mead Speaking Hi ResGov. Matt Mead at the launch of his Chairman's InitiativeThe Western Governors’ Association has launched the second year of the Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative, the 2016 Chairman's Initiative of Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead.

During the coming year WGA will organize a series of work sessions and webinars that expand on the bipartisan dialogue of the Initiative’s first year. In addition, WGA encourages stakeholders from across the spectrum of this issue to offer recommendations to further refine key themes from year one.

WGA welcomes that input by use of this questionnaire, which covers topics presented in year-one workshop breakout sessions, panel discussions and questionnaire responses. You're encouraged to respond to questions in detail, adding supplemental attachments as necessary. Once complete, send the completed questionnaire to Zach Bodhane This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. (Note: Questionnaires will be used for WGA internal purposes only.)

Those with additional questions about year two of the Initiative may also This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Get the latest news about the West and its governors by following the Western Governors' Association on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

Species Spotlight: Proactive Conservation Efforts Bring Channel Island Fox from Endangered to Recovered in Record Time

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24213309803 d530d36742 oThe Channel Island fox is a diminutive species of fox endemic to the Channel Islands in Southern California. The island fox was listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 2004 due to predation by non-native golden eagles, habitat degradation and disease introduced by mainland species entering the islands.

This installment of Species Spotlight takes a closer look at partnership-driven conservation efforts that brought the island fox from the brink of extinction in 2004 to a delisting due to recovery in 2016. This effort represents the fastest successful recovery for any ESA listed mammal in the United States.

CONSERVATION ACTIONS

In the early 1990s scientists began to notice a dramatic decline in island fox numbers. Partners from the National Park Service, the Nature Conservancy, the Catalina Island Conservancy and numerous other groups recognized the dire situation of the island fox and initiated a captive breeding program in 1998.

Following the 2004 island fox ESA listing, a golden eagle capture and relocation program was initiated. The program was designed to remove golden eagles – a predator to which the fox had no natural adaptation – and replace them with bald eagles. Given bald eagles’ preference for aquatic prey and historical habitation of the islands, they do not present a significant predatory threat for the island foxes.

Following the golden eagle relocation program, partners began the process of removing introduced mule deer and elk and feral goats, pigs and sheep. These introduced species were severely degrading habitat and inviting a suite of invasive plants to take hold on the islands. The National Park Service and the Nature Conservancy were able to successfully remove a variety of introduced mammal species from the islands, which allowed native vegetation in critical island fox habitat to rebound.

Canine distemper, a disease introduced to the islands by non-native dogs and raccoons, was responsible for nearly decimating the island fox population on Santa Catalina Island in the 1990s. In response, federal, state and private groups assisted in rounding up the remaining foxes and administering distemper and rabies vaccinations on all of the islands containing foxes. The diseases had not yet reached the other islands containing foxes, but precautionary vaccinations were administered to “core populations” of foxes on all islands to ensure that there will be sufficient survivors if the diseases were to arrive.

RESULTS

On Aug. 11, 2016, the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) announced the final delisting of the island fox. At the time of the 2004 endangered listing, the FWS estimated that there were fewer than 100 foxes remaining on all of the Channel Islands. By 2015, that number had reached roughly 4,000.

The FWS will continue to monitor the status of the island fox through microchips, radio tracking collars, annual counts and a continued vaccination program. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell remarked in a press release that “the island fox recovery is an incredible success story about the power of partnerships and the ability of collaborative conservation to correct course for a species on the brink of extinction.”

Species Spotlight, a case study series examining the challenges and opportunities in species conservation, is part of the Western Governors' Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative, the Chairman's Initiative of Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead.

More in the Species Spotlight series: 

Get the latest news about the West and its governors by following the Western Governors' Association on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

 

Species Spotlight: Conservation Agreement keeps Graham’s and White River beardtongues off ESA threatened list

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GrahamsBeardtongueSmallGraham’s beardtongue and White River beardtongue are perennial penstemon plant species endemic to Uintah County in eastern Utah and Rio Blanco County in western Colorado.

Graham’s beardtongue was listed as a candidate species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1975, while the White River beardtongue was listed as a candidate species in 1983. A candidate species is one that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) has sufficient information to propose as threatened or endangered under the ESA, but is precluded by other higher-priority listing activities.

After their original candidate listings both plants went through a cycle of delisting, and subsequent relisting, as candidate species until the FWS in 2013 proposed to list both species as threatened under the ESA. (More)

LISTEN: Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead discusses first year of Species Conservation and ESA Initiative, next steps

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Gov Mead at Resolution Session AudioWyoming Gov. Matt Mead discussed the first year of his Western Governors' Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative at WGA's 2016 Annual Meeting in Jackson Hole, Wyo.

Gov. Mead told attendees: "If we care about species, if we care about conservation, we should also care about the Endangered Species Act, and we should care about it operating at the best level possible."

Gov. Mead also released a Special Report and video on the first year of his central policy initiative, and expressed that work has just begun. "I refuse to accept that something so important as the Endangered Species Act can't be improved upon. I am not going to go forward in a timid fashion."

Listen to Gov. Mead's Keynote

Learn more about the Western Governors' Species Conservation and ESA Initiative.

Listen to new WGA Chairman Montana Gov. Steve Bullock preview his National Forest and Rangeland Management Initiative.

ANNUAL MEETING RECAPS

Day 1Day 2
Read, download approved Resolutions

Learn more about the work of the Western Governors by reviewing our policy outreach and visiting the blog. You can also sign up for e-mail updates and follow the Western Governors' Association on TwitterFacebook and LinkedIn.

WGA concerned with changes to proposed rule on petition process for endangered and threatened species

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The Western Governors' Association shared comments on June 30, 2016, with Dan Ashe, Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Eileen Sobeck, Assistant Administrator for NOAA Fisheries, in regard to the rulemaking, "Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revisions to the Regulations for Petitions."

The comments expressed the Western Governors' concern with the withdrawal of several important provisions in the initial version of the proposed rule, and recommended the Services reinsert portions of the initial proposed rule that invites greater engagement with states when implementing the Endangered Species Act. WGA emphasized, "States should be full partners with the Services in listing, recovery and delisting decisions. This includes using state fish and wildlife data and analyses as principal sources in ESA decisions." 

The outreach explained that the Services calling for state data early in the petition process and then making its consideration discretionary offers "no meaningful change to the process."

Read, download the comments. 

Get the latest news about the West and its governors by following the Western Governors' Association on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

Gov. Mead releases Chairman's report, policy resolution on Species Conservation and ESA Initiative

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IMG 5980AGov. Mead

MEDIA COVERAGE: Read this Jackson Hole News and Guide story on Gov. Mead's Initiative session at the Annual Meeting.

WGA Chairman and Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead released the report on the first year of the Western Governors’ Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative and announced a policy resolution that will guide the Governors' continuing work to improve the efficiency of the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

"If you care, as Western Governors do, about species and conservation, you also have to care (More)

Species Spotlight: Collaborative conservation puts Columbian white-tailed deer on road to recovery

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bigcwtdThe Columbian white-tailed deer began to decline in the Pacific Northwestern United States in the early 1900s due to unrestricted hunting and land conversion. Once numbering in the tens of thousands, less than 1,000 of the deer existed by 1975 when they were listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

This installment of Species Spotlight examines the conservation actions of state, local and private partners to help recover the Douglas County and the Columbia River distinct population segments (DPS) of the Columbian white-tailed deer to the point of delisting and proposed delisting under the ESA.

CONSERVATION ACTIONS

Columbian white-tailed deer are threatened by both habitat modification and over-predation. After the species was listed under the ESA in 1975, wildlife managers and local partners began to reduce predation by (More)

WATCH VIDEO: State wildlife agencies' immense impact on species conservation

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State wildlife agencies have an unparalleled positive impact on wildlife conservation, starting with an annual aggregate budget of $5.6 billion. State wildlife agencies employ nearly 50,000 employees and enlist 190,000 volunteers each year to manage 990,000 square miles of wildlife habitat. These numbers underline the tremendous impact of state-led conservation by agencies that improve habitat, manage wildlife and restore endangered species for future generations to enjoy. (More)

Species Spotlight: Work since El Segundo Blue Butterfly listing has led to population revival

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Species Spotlight ButterflyThe El Segundo Blue Butterfly relies on seacliff buckwheat for survivalThe El Segundo Blue Butterfly is endemic to the coastal dunes of Los Angeles County in California. The sandy dunes and surrounding ecosystem are essential to the butterfly’s survival.

Extensive development in this habitat put the El Segundo Blue Butterfly population in danger of extinction. In 1976, the butterfly was listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act, prompting the preservation of the last remaining dunes of its habitat.

Since then, through protection and restoration of the butterfly’s habitat, the population is growing. The tiny butterflies have even traveled to newly restored dunes, a feat that scientists never expected that will make the population more resilient as it continues to rebound.

Species Spotlight, a case study series examining the challenges and opportunities in species conservation, is part of the Western Governors' Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative, the Chairman's Initiative of Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead.

CONSERVATION ACTIONS

The major threat to El Segundo Blue Butterfly survival is (More)

WATCH: Powerful endangered species speech in Hawaii offers insights for all the West

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We've just concluded the Western Governors' Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative workshop series, which included engaging discussions and insightful speeches by Western Governors and species conservation leaders.

Sam ‘Ohu Gon III delivered a stirring, insightful presentation at the final workshop in Hawaii that we thought was particularly worth highlighting. The speech (More)

Gov. Ige emphasizes critical balance of species, people at Hawaii ESA workshop

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Governor Ige at ESA WorkshopHawaii Gov. David Ige opened the workshopHawaii Gov. David Ige kicked off the final workshop of the Western Governors' Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative on Oahu by emphasizing the importance of preserving his state's staggering array of species while also supporting the people who live on the islands.

"It will take a great effort," Gov. Ige said at the the two-day (April 7-8) workshop in Honolulu, "to balance the needs of the species here with the needs of Hawaii's human inhabitants."

The Honolulu workshop (More)

Find agenda, livestream details for Hawaii workshop of WGA Species Conservation and ESA Initiative hosted by Gov. Ige

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ESA Website Main Page

Hawaii Gov. David Ige addressed "Island Energy Development and the ESA: Unique Solutions for Rare Species" to kick off the final workshop of the Western Governors' Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative April 7-8 in Oahu, Hawaii.

Other topics discussed included protecting marine areas; state and local consultation and coordination; climate change and the ESA; (More)

Species Spotlight: Delisting the American Peregrine Falcon through captive breeding and collaborative conservation

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bigfalconThe American Peregrine Falcon was once abundant throughout the United States, but widespread use of the pesticide DDT caused the bird’s population to decline rapidly. This led to a 1970 listing of “endangered” under the Endangered Species Conservation Act.

This installment of Species Spotlight examines the collaborative conservation actions and regulatory changes that led to the banning of DDT and the captive breeding of thousands of falcons. These efforts helped grow the Peregrine Falcon population to the point that the species was delisted in 1999.

CONSERVATION ACTIONS

The pesticide DDT thins the shells of Peregrine eggs, disrupting breeding cycles and decreasing bird populations. In 1972, the Environmental Protection Agency banned the pesticide DDT for most uses in the U.S. This action was a critical first step (More)

Governors Hickenlooper, Mead launch Denver workshop on ESA Initiative

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Governor HickenlooperGov. HickenlooperColorado Gov. John Hickenlooper and Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead kicked off the latest workshop of the Western Governors' Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative in Denver by challenging participants to continue collaborative conservation work while looking for ways to improve the effectiveness of the Endangered Species Act.

Gov. Hickenlooper, who hosted the two-day (March 9-10) workshop, said it was important for Western states to harvest their natural resources while protecting the native habitat.

Gov. Mead reminded attendees of the ESA's 1.4% success rate for species recovery, noting that often it was legal challenges alone that keep species listed. "Lawyers are winnning on the ESA. The question is: Are the species winning?"

The Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative is (More)

Find agenda, livestream details for Denver workshop of WGA Species Conservation and ESA Initiative hosted by Governors Hickenlooper, Mead

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ESA Website Main Page

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper hosted and spoke at the third workshop of the Western Governors' Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative March 9-10 in Denver.

Gov. Hickenlooper was joined at the workshop by WGA Chairman and Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead, who also spoke as part of his Chairman's Initiative. Topics discussed at the workshop included (More)

Species Spotlight: Recovering the Oregon chub through conservation partnerships

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chubOregon chub populations were in steep decline due to habitat loss and nonnative species predation in 1993 when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) listed the Oregon native minnow under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

This installment of Species Spotlight takes a closer look at partnership-driven conservation efforts since then by private landowners and conservation groups, as well as state, tribal and federal entities. That work helped grow populations and, in 2015, resulted in the Oregon chub becoming the first fish to be delisted under the ESA.

CONSERVATION ACTIONS (More)

Governors Hickenlooper, Mead to host March 9-10 workshop in Denver of Species Conservation and ESA Initiative

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Colorado Gov John HickenlooperGov . HickenlooperColorado Gov. John Hickenlooper hosted and spoke at the third workshop of the Western Governors' Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative March 9-10 in Denver.

Gov. Hickenlooper was joined at the workshop by WGA Chairman and Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead, who also spoke as part of his Chairman's Initiative.

Topics discussed included state leadership in species conservation efforts; legal analysis of the Endangered Species Act, and species conservation funding. (Watch all the sessions)

Species Conservation & ESA Initiative Webinar: The Role of Conflict and Litigation in the ESA

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The Western Governors’ Association hosted a Feb. 25 webinar as part of its series for the Species Conservation and ESA Initiative.

The Role of Conflict and Litigation in the ESA examined how litigation shapes the implementation of the Endangered Species Act and affects species conservation efforts. Panelists representing a diverse range of interests will participate in a moderated discussion, as well as a question and answer session. Watch the webinar.

WEBINAR DETAILS (More)

Gov. Ige to host Hawaii workshop of Species Conservation and ESA Initiative April 7-8

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Hawaii Gov David IgeGov. IgeHawaii Gov. David Ige hosted and spoke at the final workshop of the Western Governors' Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative on April 7-8 in Oahu, Hawaii.

Topics discussed at the workshop included: protecting marine areas; state and local consultation and coordination; climate change and the Endangered Species Act; invasive species impacts on species conservation efforts; and listing and delisting considerations. (Find videos of all sessions.)

The workshop, continued the regional conversation about the signature initiative of WGA Chairman and Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead.

The Chairman's Initiative of (More)

Species Spotlight: How collaborative conservation led to a 'Not Warranted' ESA determination for Arctic Grayling in Montana

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Arctic grayling populations, including in Montana’s Big Hole River, had been declining for decades when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in 1992 first considered listing the freshwater fish under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

graylingThis installment of Species Spotlight takes a closer look at the collaborative conservation efforts since then by private landowners, conservation groups, state and federal entities. Ultimately, that work helped grow grayling populations and, in 2014, resulted in a USFWS determination that listing the species was not warranted.

Species Spotlight, a case study series examining the challenges and opportunities in species conservation, is part of the Western Governors' Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative, the Chairman's Initiative of Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead.

CONSERVATION ACTIONS (More)

Species Conservation & ESA Initiative Webinar: Critical Habitat and Invasive Species

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main logo esa head

The Western Governors’ Association hosted a Feb. 4 webinar as part of its series for the Species Conservation and ESA Initiative.

WATCH: Critical Habitat and Invasive Species

The webinar examined how critical habitat designations are influenced by invasive species. Panelists representing a diverse range of interests will participate in a moderated discussion, as well as a question and answer session. Register here.

WEBINAR DETAILS

Gov. Otter urges engagement, innovation to improve species conservation, ESA at Idaho workshop

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Gov Otter Podium Boise Workshop for BlogGov. C.L. "Butch" OtterIdaho Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter welcomed participants to the Idaho workshop of the Western Governors' Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative on Jan. 19 and urged them to be "willing to engage, to listen to the other side's point of view."

"Being part of the process, being part of the solution, and being seriously considered with our ideas is what matters and will continue to matter," said Gov. Otter (Read the Associated Press Story). The governor spoke at the second regional workshop of the Chairman's Initiative of Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead for the Western Governors' Association at the Riverside Hotel in Boise, Idaho.

Gary Frazer, Assistant Director of Ecological Services for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, highlighted the importance of engagement as well. "We can never stop learning, and we know we don't have all the answers, so we look forward to working with the Western Governors' Association on improving how the Act works." (More)

First Chairman's Initiative webinar to focus on Black-footed Ferret recovery

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ferretBlack-footed FerretThe Western Governors' Association will host the first in a series of webinars as part of its Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative on Jan. 14. 

Voluntary Species Conservation Incentives and Collaboration will highlight the recovery of Black-footed Ferret in Colorado and Wyoming. Panelists representing a diverse range of interest will participate in a moderated discussion, as well as a question and answer session. Register here

WEBINAR DETAILS (More)

Register for webinars: Western Governors’ Species Conservation and ESA Initiative

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The Western Governors' Association hosted a series of webinars as part of its Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative. During each webinar panelists representing a diverse range of interest will participate in a moderated discussion, as well as a question and answer session. The webinars:

ferretBlack-footed FerretVoluntary Species Conservation Incentives and Collaboration highlighted the recovery of Black-footed Ferret in Colorado and Wyoming.

Critical Habitat and Invasive Species examined how critical habitat designations are influenced by invasive species.

The Role of Conflict and Litigation in the ESA illustrated how litigation shapes the implementation of the Endangered Species Act and affects species conservation efforts.

Watch all webinars of the Chairman's Initiative of Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead, which enables states to share best practices in species management and explore how to improve the efficacy of the Endangered Species Act.

Get the latest news of the West and the Western Governors' Association by following the WGA on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

Gov. Otter to host Idaho workshop of Species Conservation and ESA Initiative on Jan. 19

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Idaho Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter hosted the second workshop of the Western Governors' Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative on Jan. 19 in Boise, Idaho.

Otter 9Idaho Gov. OtterGov. Otter spoke at the workshop, which continued the regional conversation about the signature initiative of WGA Chairman and Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead. (Watch all the sessions)

Species conservation and Endangered Species Act (ESA) topics discussed at the workshop included the role of state and local governments in coordination and consultation; best available science; critical habitat designations; policy for evaluation of conservation efforts, and landscape-level conservation and incentivizing private landowners. (More)